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OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS 
IN PENNSYLVANIA IN 1975 


William S. Lytle 
Robert G. Piotrowski 
Louis Heyman 


COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES 

BUREAU OF 

TOPOGRAPHIC AND GEOLOGIC SURVEY 

- - — -ik, LIBRARY m , 

Arthur A. Socolow, State Geologist 


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2016 with funding from 

This project is made possible by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services as administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education through the Office of Commonwealth Libraries 


https ://archive.org/details/oilgasdevelopmen00lytl_1 6 


Progress Report 189 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS 
IN PENNSYLVANIA IN 1975 


William S. Lytle 
Robert G. Piotrowski 
Louis Heyman 


PENNSYLVANIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

FOURTH SERIES 

HARRISBURG 


1976 


Copyright 1976 
by the 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

Quotations from this book may be published if credit is given to 
the Pennsylvania Geological Survey 


ADDITIONAL COPIES 

OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PURCHASED FROM 
BUREAU OF PUBLICATIONS, P. O. BOX 1365 
HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 17125 


CONTENTS 


Abstract 

Introduction 

Acknowledgements 

Part I. Completion highlights for 1975 
Shallow highlights 

Pre-Speechley gas development 
Glade sandstone oil development 
Other highlights 

Part II. Oil and gas industry activity for 1975 
Basis for statistics 

Previous compilations 

Indicated status of local industry 
Drilling and completions 
Production and reserves 
Gas storage fields 

Secondary and tertiary oil recovery projects 
Oil and gas prices 

Land sales 

Geophysical activity 
1975 Highlights 
Industry related activities 
Subsurface base maps 

Part III. Oil and gas geology division studies 

Onondaga “reefs”— McKean County, Pennsylvania 
by Robert G. Piotrowski 

Part IV. Summarized records of deep wells reported in 1975 


Page 

1 

9 

9 

9 

9 

3 

5 

5 

5 

5 

6 
6 
6 
9 

15 

18 

18 

99 


28 

28 

29 

29 

35 


ILLUSTRATIONS 

FIGURES 


Figure 1. Highlight wells reported in 1975 4 

2. Shallow well activity, 1950-1975 15 

3. Annual rate of deep sand exploration and develop- 
ment, 1930-1975 ]fi 

1. Oil and gas map of Pennsylvania showing exploratory 

wells reported in 1975 20 

Annual production of crude oil in Pennsylvania 22 


iii 


5. 


Page 


6. Crude oil prices, production and completions, Brad- 
ford District 23 

7. Production, consumption and reserves of natural gas 

in Pennsylvania 24 

8. Shale gas in Pennsylvania 27 

9. Index of available subsurface base maps 28 

10. Onondaga isopach map— reef discovery, McKean 

County, Pennsylvania 30 

11. Mechanical log of Onondaga reef discovery 31 

12. Stratigraphic section of the Onondaga limestone sub- 
divisions 32 

13. Isopach of Edgecliff member, Onondaga Formation 33 

14. Isopach of Seneca, Moorehouse, and Nedrow members 

of Onondaga Formation 34 

TABLES 

Table 1. Shallow and deep highlight well statistics 3 

2. Well completions in Pennsylvania, 1975 7 

3. Old wells drilled deeper in Pennsylvania, 1975 8 

4. Drilling and completions reported, 1975 10 

5. Exploratory and primary development reported, 1975 

and 1974 11 

6. Footage reported, 1975 and 1974 12 

7. Reported discoveries in Pennsylvania, 1975 12 

8. Selected exploratory failures reported in Pennsylvania, 

1975 14 

9. Production and reserves in Pennsylvania, 1975 17 

10. Average daily oil production 18 

11. Deep gas production in Pennsylvania, 1975 19 

12. Crude oil prices per barrel, Pennsylvania, 1975 25 

13. Summarized record of deep wells reported in 1975 36 


iv 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS 
IN PENNSYLVANIA IN 1975 


by 


William S. Lytle, Robert G Piotrowski and Louis Heyman 


ABSTRACT 

Drilling for oil increased 3 percent in 1975 over that of 1974 while 
gas well drilling increased 36 percent. As reported last year, the new 
drilling depth record is 21,460 feet which was established by the No. 1 
Leonard Svetz well in Somerset County in Upper Cambrian. The record 
of the well is published in Table 13. Seismic activity was down from 
123 crew-weeks in 1974 to 50 crew-weeks in 1975 in 18 counties, with 
most of the activity being Vibroseis, costing operators about $1,000,000. 
Oil production and reserves decreased and gas production and reserves 
increased from 1974. The price of new and stripper crude oil in the 
Bradford District advanced from $11.85 per barrel January 1, 1975 to 
$13.07 at the year’s end. By the end of 1975, most purchasers of gas 
were paying at least 80 cents per Mcf for new intrastate gas with some 
paying up to $2.00 per Mcf. 

The total number of highlight wells increased from 70 in 1974 to 119 
in 1975. The most active gas area was again in Indiana County with 
374 new gas wells, up 55 from 1974. Warren, Venango and McKean 
Counties were the most active oil areas with 272, 175 and 146 wells 
drilled respectively. 

Pennsylvania Grade crude oil production decreased 6 percent to 
3,132,000 barrels, while production of Corning Grade crude increased 
16 percent to 67,000 barrels. Shallow gas production increased 4 per- 
cent to 72,620 MMcf, and deep gas decreased 7 percent to 12,152 
MMcf. Gas storage capacity increased to 755,497 MMcf, and stored 
gas reserves increased 2 percent to 596,324 MMcf. 

Other well completions, including service, gas storage, and old well 
workovers, decreased 4 percent in 1975. The total of all wells reported 
in 1975 was up by 179 wells, or 12 percent greater than the 1974 total. 

Of the 1,399 primary wells reported, 112 were exploratory and 1,287 
were development. This is an 11 percent increase in exploratory wells 
and a 16 percent increase in development wells from 1974. Exploratory 
completions were 51 percent successful and development completions 
99 percent successful. 


1 


2 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


Exploratory footage was up 8 percent and development footage was 
up 31 percent from that of 1974. The average depth of all wells was 
2,363 feet, 224 feet more than in 1974. 

A joint Maraflood operation between the Penn Grade Crude Oil 
Association and ERDA will soon commence in the tight Bradford 
sandstone in the Bradford field, McKean County. 

INTRODUCTION 

Progress Report 178, Representative Gamma-ray Logs from Shallow 
and Deep Wells , Western Pennsylvania , should be referred to for strati- 
graphic information. Contained in this publication are three shallow 
gamma-ray logs (two from the oil belt and one from the gas fields) and 
one deep gamma-ray log on which shallow and deep producing intervals 
have been designated. 

Part I of this report contains comments on wells in the commonwealth 
with good completions or of special note for other reasons. Part II con- 
tains the statistics and review of industry activities for the year. Part III 
is on the recent Onondaga “reef” discovery and play in McKean County 
and part IV is the summarized records of the 1975 deep wells. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

Appreciation is hereby extended to the Oil and Gas Division of the 
Bureau of Land Protection and Reclamation, Pennsylvania Department 
of Environmental Resources, for the cooperation of that Division in 
sharing the drillers’ logs which are submitted to them by the operators 
under the oil and gas law. 

We also acknowledge with appreciation the cooperation of the Pennsyl- 
vania Grade Crude Oil Association; the Pennsylvania Oil, Gas, and 
Minerals Association; the Pennsylvania Game Commission; the American 
Gas Association; the American Petroleum Institute; Petroleum Informa- 
tion; the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources’ Bureau 
of Forestry, Division of Minerals. 

Appreciation is extended to all operators and companies who released 
natural gas production statistics and other data. 

PART I. COMPLETION HIGHLIGHTS FOR 1975 

SHALLOW HIGHLIGHTS 

The lower limits of initial production used in considering a shallow 
well (Upper Devonian or younger) as a highlight well were established 
at 50 bopd or more and/or over 2 MMcfgpd. 


COMPLETION HIGHLIGHTS 


3 


There were 119 shallow highlight wells reported in 1975. A number of 
operators fail to report a well’s initial production to the regulatory 
agency. Therefore, there are probably several highlight wells that do not 
appear in the above figure. The shallow highlight wells composed 9 per- 
cent of the total exploratory and development wells reported (Table 5) . 
Table 1 gives highlight well statistics. 

Figure 1 shows the distribution of the highlight wells. The following 
is a brief description of those highlight occurrences about which informa- 
tion was released through the Oil and Gas Division of the Bureau of 
Land Protection and Reclamation. 

Pre-Speechley Gas Development 

The pre-Speechley (Upper Devonian Zone B) development gas play 
in the west-central part of the state increased considerably over that in 
1974 with 548 gas wells drilled in a five-county area in 1975 compared with 
396 drilled in the same area in 1974. The number drilled increased in 
each of the five counties with 38 in Armstrong County in 1975 compared 
with 13 in 1974, in Clearfield 20 to 18, Indiana 374 to 319, in Jefferson 
58 to 19, and in Westmoreland 58 to 27. There were 30 gas highlight wells 
completed in this zone compared to 14 in 1974. Wells were completed 
with potentials in MMcfgpd as follows: Indiana County in the Arcadia 
field 5.2; Cochvale 2.0; Coleman Hill 4.0; Crete 2.1, 2.3, 2.8, 3.9; East Run 
5.0: Lewisville 3.8; Marion Centre 2.0, 2.4, 2.6, 3.5, 3.9; McKee Run 2.0; 
Riclnnond-Big Run 3 wells with 2.2, 3 with 2.3 and 1 with 3.1; Tannery 
2.1; Warner Hill with 2.0 and 2.2; Jefferson County in the Richmond- 


Table 1. Shallow and Deep Highlight Well Statistics 




1975 



1974 


Fields and Pools with highlight 
wells 


25 



21 


Counties with highlight wells 


8 



6 


Producing Zones 

Gas 

Wells 

Oil 

Total 

Gas 

Wells 

Oil 

Total 

Oriskany 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Pre-Speechley in Zone B* 

30 

14 

44 

14 

16 

30 

Speechley or younger in Zone B* 

0 

66 

66 

0 

39 

39 

Zone D* 

0 

9 

9 

0 

1 

1 

Totals 

30 

89 

119 

14 

56 

70 


* Zone of Upper Devonian rocks established in Progress Report 178 


WEST VIRGINIA 


4 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 



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Figure 1. Highlight wells reported in 1975. 


INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


5 


Big Run field with 2.3; Westmoreland County in the Blairsville field with 
2.5 and in the New Alexandria field 2.0, 2.1 and 2.3. 

Fourteen highlight oil wells were reported producing from this zone 
as follows, with potentials in bopd: McKean County— Windfall field 60; 
Potter County-Crystal 50; Warren County-Cooper 7 wells at 50, 2 at 
100, 1 at 135 and 2 at 140. 

Glade Sandstone Oil Development 

There are 66 crude oil highlight wells that are located in Warren 
County and produce from the Glade and associated sands. Below are 
shown the fields and pools in which the wells are located and their initial 
productions in bopd: Chandlers Valley pool 50; Clarendon field 6 with 
50 and 1 with 60; Elkhorn Run 1 with 100; Morrison Run 6 with 50 to 
80, 32 with 100; Sugar Grove 5 with 60; and Youngsville 1 with 50, 9 
with 100 and 6 with 150. 


Other Highlights 

Two Zone D wells were productive in the Vernon field in Crawford 
County at 184 bopd and 59 bopd. Other productive wells in this zone 
were completed in Forest County in the Asbury Chapel field with poten- 
tials of 55, 60, 85 and 101 bopd and a 50 barrel well in the White Church 
field. There were no deep (Middle Devonian or older) highlight wells 
during 1975. 

PART II. OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY ACTIVITY FOR 1975 

BASIS FOR STATISTICS 

Local industry statistics herein reported are consistent with figures 
submitted to national industry organizations. Consequently, drilling and 
completion data are entirely based on drillers’ records and location plats 
forwarded to the Pennsylvania Geological Survey by the Oil and Gas 
Division of the Bureau of Land Protection and Reclamation of the De- 
partment of Environmental Resources, the administrative and regulatory 
agency for the oil and gas laws. Only those wells for which records and 
plats have been received within the year are reported. This includes wells 
drilled in prior years for which records were submitted and received in 
1975. It does not include 1975 wells completed for which records had not 
been submitted within the year. 

Oil production and reserve data were obtained from the American 
Petroleum Institute and gas production and reserve data were obtained 
from the American Gas Association. 


6 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


PREVIOUS COMPILATIONS 

The summarized records of deep wells (those which reach rocks ol 
Middle Devonian age or older) are shown in Table 13 and the locations 
of all exploratory wells are on Figure 4 (centerfold) . For those deep 
wells drilled prior to 1950, the summarized records and other information 
on the commonwealth's oil and gas activities are to be found in Mineral 
Resource Report 31 (Pennsylvania Geological Survey). Similar informa- 
tion for the 1950 to 1954 period was published in Mineral Resource 
Report 39, and lor the 1955 to 1959 period in Mineral Resource Report 
45. For years 1960 through 1974, this information was published annually 
in Progress Reports 158, 160, 165, 166, 168, 172, 173, 175, 177, 181, 183, 
184, 186, 187, and 188 of the Pennsylvania Geological Survey. Oil and 
gas developments in the shallow sands (Upper Devonian or younger) 
are described in Mineral Resource Report 45 and in Progress Reports 135, 
139, 143, 144, 147, 150, 151, 154, 155, 157, 158, 160, 165, 166, 168, 172, 
173, 175, 177, 181, 183, 184, 186, 187 and 188. 

A list of deep-well samples on file with the Survey was published in 
the Survey’s Catalogue of Deep Well Samples and Geophysical Logs to 
January 1 , 1959 (W. R. Wagner, Inf. Circ. 16) . Supplemental lists were 
published in Progress Reports 157, 158, 3 60, 165, 166, 168 and 173. These 
and other deep and shallow well samples, geophysical logs, and other well 
data are also on file with the Survey. An inventory of all deep and shallow 
well samples is brought up to date annually. It is available on request at 
cost of reproduction from the Survey’s Pittsburgh office. 

INDICATED STATUS OF LOCAL INDUSTRY 

Oil well completions, 686 in 1975, increased 3% over the 667 comple- 
tions in 1974. Pennsylvania Grade crude oil production decreased from 
3,341 M bbls. in 1974 to 3,132 M bbls. in 1975 or a 6% decrease, while oil 
reserves, due to revisions and 1975 production, decreased 5% to 47,377 M 
bbls. from 49,696 M bbls. in 1974. The price increase for a barrel of new 
or stripper crude oil made areas economic to operate that were previously 
considered sub-marginal or marginal. Corning Grade crude oil produc- 
tion increased 16% to 67,000 bbls. 

Gas well completions increased from 469 in 1974 to 640 in 1975. Com- 
pletions of wells classified as oil and gas wells remained the same at 5 
in each year. Reserves of gas increased 13% while production increased 
3%. The amount of gas in storage increased 2%. 

Drilling and Completions 

The breakdown of completions by county is shown in Table 2 and the 
old wells drilled deeper in Table 3. 


Table 2 . Completions in Pennsylvania, 1975 


INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


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Initial productions for majority of wells not given. 


Table 3. Old Wells Drilled Deeper in Pennsylvania 


8 


OIL ANI) GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


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INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


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Table 4 shows that drilling for oil and gas increased 12% in 1975 over 
that in 1974 when there was a 10% increase over that of the previous year. 
During the year exploratory and development drilling increased 11 and 16 
percent respectively from 1974, as shown in Table 5. 

The total footage in 1975 was up 24% with respect to the amount 
drilled in 1974 (Table 6) . 

The 1975 reported discoveries are listed in Table 7 and selected reported 
exploratory failures are listed in Table 8. The locations of all the ex- 
ploratory tests are shown in Figure 4. Figure 2 is a graph of the annual 
rate of shallow activity in the corpmonwealth from 1950 to 1975, while 
Figure 3 shows the annual rate of deep exploration and development 
from 1930 to 1975. 

At the end of 1975 a total of 3,330 deep wells had been drilled since 
the beginning of exploration in the deeper horizons. Of the 3,330 deep 
wells, 1,777 were gas wells, 141 oil and gas wells, 1,184 dry holes, 222 
gas storage wells, 4 for waste disposal, and 2 for testing drilling equipment. 

In addition to the 71 dry holes that were drilled in 1975 and plugged 
and abandoned, there were 1,120 old oil wells and 164 old gas wells that 
were plugged and abandoned. 

Production and Reserves 

As shown in Table 9 during 1975, oil production and reserves decreased 
and gas production and reserves increased from 1974. 

The 3,132,000 barrels of Pennsylvania Grade crude had a value of 
about $38,397,477 if it is all classified as new or stripper oil. Possibly 
some of it should be classified as old oil, but these figures are not available. 
The 67,000 barrels of Corning Grade crude oil was produced from the 
Medina sandstone (Lower Silurian) , mostly in Crawford County. This 
oil had a value of approximately $785,240. Development drilling for 
crude oil was up 3 percent for 1975 from 1974. Former district areas have 
changed with respect to coverage. Therefore, only average daily oil 
production figures were available for the bottom curve of Figure 6. 

Figure 5 shows the annual production of crude oil in Pennsylvania from 
1859 to 1975 and in the Bradford field from 1871 to 1975. The monthly 
variation in crude oil price, production and well completions is plotted in 
Figure 6 for the years 1930 to 1975 for the Bradford District (old) . 

At the end of 1975 there were approximately 17,500 producing gas wells 
in the commonwealth. The 84,772,000 Mcf of shallow and deep gas shown 
in Table 9 can be divided into 72,620,000 Mcf of shallow gas and 12,152,000 
Mcf of deep gas produced in Pennsylvania during 1975. Figure 7 shows 
the following for the years 1946 to the present: 1) the yearly production 
of natural gas; 2) the yearly consumption of natural gas; 3) the natural 


Table 4. Drilling and Completions Reported, 1975 


10 


OIL. AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 



Includes 1 old well drilled deeper 

Includes 3 dry deep exploratory wells completed as shallow development gas wells 


Table 5. Exploratory and Primary Development Reported, 1975 


INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


1 I 


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Table 6. Footage Reported, 1975 and 1974 


12 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


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INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


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1 Alex Kovacs Group Pool Fayette anticline. 


Table 8. Selected Exploratory Failures Reported in Pennsylvania, 1975 


14 OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 







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INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


15 



Figure 2. Shallow well activity, 1950-1975. 


gas reserves; and 4) the amount ol natural gas in storage. The consump- 
tion of natural gas in the state continues to decline from its high in 1972 
of 829,031,000 Mcf to 715,623,000 Mcf in 1974. The deep gas production 
by field and pool is shown in Table 11. 

Gas Storage Fields 

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were deep wells and 5 shallow. Several gas storage wells were worked over 
during the year. Storage well drilling activity was down 33 percent from 



03i3nd«oo snj* io «3awnN 


Figure 3. Annual rate of deep sand exploration and development, 1930-1975. 


Table 9. Production and Reserves in Pennsylvania, 1975 


INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


17 


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18 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


Table 10. Average Daily Oil Production 


District 

1975 

1974 

% Change 

‘Bradford District 

4,263 

5,459 

-22 

‘Middle and Southwestern District 

4,317 

3,700 

+ 11 

Medina (Corning) 

184 

159 

+ 16 

TOTAL 

8,764 

9,318 

- 6 


*1975 production on a different area base than 1974. 


that of 1974. Figure 8 of Progress Report 186 shows the distribution and 
lists the names of the current gas storage fields in Pennsylvania. A map 
of the gas storage fields at a scale of 1:500,000 is available at the Survey’s 
Pittsburgh olhce at cost of reproduction. 

The storage capacity increased during the year to 755,497,000 Mcf 
compared to 728,1 10,000 Mcf in 1974. The total stored recoverable gas on 
December 31, 1975 was 596,324,000 Mcf or 2 percent more than the 
amount in storage on December 31, 1974. The gas in storage consisted of 
28,634,000 Mcf of native gas and 607,713,000 Mcf of stored gas. 

Secondary and Tertiary Recovery Projects 

There were 97 water or gas injection wells completed during the year, 
down 15 percent from those completed in 1974. In McKean County 146 
oil wells were completed, most of them in secondary recovery projects. 
The waterfloods in McKean County produced about 50 percent of Penn- 
sylvania’s yearly crude oil production. 

The McKean County Bradford field Maraflood project continues into 
its seventh year of operation on an economical basis. The Warren County 
project at Selkirk has been shut down. A new Maraflood project in tight 
Bradford sandstone in the Bradford field, McKean County, is about to get 
under way. This is a joint project between the Penn Grade Crude Oil 
Association and ERDA. 


Oil and Gas Prices 

Crude oil prices for the year are shown in Table 12. Gas prices have 
varied considerably in the commonwealth during the year. By the year’s 
end most purchasers of gas were paying at least 80 cents per Mcf for new 
intrastate gas with some paying up to $2.00 per Mcf. A number of com- 
panies have adjusted their old contract up to 60 cents or more per Mcf. 
Interstate gas is 52 cents per Mcf for large producers, those producing 
over 10,000,000 Mcf gas per year, and up to $1.40 per Mcf for the small 
operators (several factors determine the price) . 


INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


19 


Table 11. Deep-Gas Production in Pennsylvania, 1975 


County 

Field 

Pool 

Discovery 

Armstrong 

Goheenvil le* 

Snydervil le 

10/23/70 


Roaring Run* 

Roaring Run 




Oriskany 

12/14/70 

Bedford 



12/14/57 

Cambria 

.... Patton 

Burley 

1/15/69 



Pindleton 

6/30/69 

Cameron 



8/24/73 


East Emporium 


11/18/71 

Cameron & Elk. . . . 

Whippoorwil 1 


7/10/61 

Cameron, Elk, 




Jefferson, Clear 

Punxsutawney-* 

TOTAL 


field and Indiana. .. .Driftwood 

Anderson Creek 

9/25/75 



Benezette 

1/ 5/53 1 



Dri ftwood 

9/15/51 1 



Boone Mt. 

9/18/58 ) 



DuBois 

1/ 6/60 J 



Sabula 

8/26/63 



Hel vetia 

5/11/60 




Reed- 

5/ 9/55 




Deemer 

12/ 1/53 




Rockton 

2/25/55 




Sykesvil le 

11/10/60 




Hicks Run 

6/ 7/56 

Clearfield 

west Decatur 


3/30/73 

Clinton 4 Potter. 

Leidy 

TOTAL 

1/ 9/50 



Ole Bull 

1/ 9/59 

Crawford 

. . . .Athens 


9/20/74 


Greenwood Sparta 

Eastman Hill 

10/30/75 

Crawford & Erie. . 

. . . .Conneaut 

TOTAL 

2/11/57 



Bushnel 1- 




Lexington 

12/31/58 



Indian Spring 

9/11/57 



Kastle 

7/14/62 



lundys Lane 

11/ 9/61 



Pierce 

12/31/58 



West Mead 

7/ 8/74 

Elk 

. . . . Benzinger 


11/ 7/72 


Horton 

Boot Jack 

9/20/73 

Erie 

. . . .Alder Run 


10/30/75 


Bull Reservoir 


9/17/72 


Burgess 


10/17/60 


Corry 

TOTAL 

4/29/47 



Beaver Dam 

5/20/53 


McKean 


1/19/73 


Meade 


8/23/46 


Northeast 

Orchard Beach 

2/ 8/74 

Fayette 

Ohiopyle 


12/28/59 


Sandy Creek* 


8/ 8/63 



Fike 

8/ 8/63 



Quebec Run 

6/31/69 


Spruel 1 


10/31/61 


Summi t 

TOTAL 

3/24/38 



North Summit 

3/24/38 



South Surrcnit 

5/ 9/42 

Indiana 

. . . .Cherry Hi 1 1 * 

Crichton 

1/ 9/63 1 



Hadden 

7/11/63 J 


Jacksonville 


9/21/56 


Nolo 


9/30/56 


Strongstown 

Pineton 

12/20/69 

Jefferson 

. . . Big Run* 

Elk Run 

6/30/65 

McKean 

.... Bradford 

Cyclone 

2/18/74 



Minard Run 

1/10/75 


Corydon 


9/ 8/72 

Mercer 

Henderson 

Kilgore 

10/26/66 


Wheatland 


7/24/63 

Potter 

Ulysses 


10/ 2/39 1 



New Field 

4/ 2/62 j 

Somerset 

Boswell 

TOTAL 

11/11/58 



Boswel 1 

11/11/58 



Snyder 

6/16/60 


Shanksvil le 


9/22/73 

Venango 

Barkeyville 

Duncan 

4/ 5/73 


Franklin Oak 




Forest 

Ga 1 1 oway 

11/12/73 


Wesley 

Irwin 

12/ 1/72 

Warren 

Sugar Grove 

Pettigrew 

5/29/70 


Whites Run 


10/30/75 

Washington 

Daniels Run* 

Glyde 

9/ 6/61 

Westmoreland. . . . 

81airsvi 1 le* 

Kahl 

10/23/62 


Latrobe* 

Dry Ridge 

8/25/46 


Jacobs Creek* 

Ba 1 1 ey 

12/26/61 


Lycippus 

TOTAL 

8/17/49 



St- Boniface 




Chapel 

9/13/56 


Murrysvi 1 1 e* 

TOTAL 

11/ 3/1878 



Duquesne 

8/ 8/65 

Westmoreland 4 




Somerset 

Johnstown 

TOTAL 

5/16/57 



Baldwin 

5/22/60 1 



Beck 

5/16/57 J 



Williams 

2/14/58 


Seven Springs 

TOTAL 

12/15/58 



Blair 

12/ 5/58 1 



Tunnel 

3/10/65 J 



Seven Springs 

8/ 3/66 


CuJulstive 

Fnd of 1974 
fin Met) 

Production 
7975 
(In Met ) 

Production at 
End of 197 5 
(In Hcf) 

Status of 
Field of Pool at 
End of 197 S 

94,992 

106,503 

201 ,495 

Producing 


2,732.622** 

1,227,228 

3,959,850 

Producing 


3,125,808 


3,125,808 

Gas Storage 


94,116 

3,317,477 

69,924 

478.414 

164,040 

3,795,891 

Producing 

Producing 


1 ,321 ,000 

792.000 

2,113,000 

Shut-In 

Producing 


15,146,000 

148,000 

15,294,000 

Producing 


481 .218,000 

2,312,000 

483,530,000 

Producing 

Shut-In 


246.508,000 

817,000 

247,325,000 

Producing 


103,203,000 

697,000 

103,900,000 

Producing 


883,000 

16.000 

899,000 

Producing 


126,447,000 

743.000 

127,190,000 

Producing 


4,177,000 

39,000 

4,216,000 

Producing 


244,882 

559,932 

804,814 

Producing 


160,189,061 

5,389,029 

35.000 

35.000 

160,224,061 

5.424,029 

Gas Storage J Producing 
Producing 




Shut-In 

Shut-In 


33,610,393 

1 .445,590 

35,055,983 

Producing 4 

Abandoned 

14,836.603 

12,806.013 

3.008,574 

1,797,838 

785,634 

433,331 

646.852 

128,834 

207,713 

25,598 

3,262 

15,269,934 

13.452.865 

3,137,408 

2,005,551 

811,232 

3,262 

Producing 4 

Producing 

Producing 

Producing 

Producing 

Producing 

Abandoned 

3,349 

2,900 

6,249 

Shut-In 

Producing 


154,613 
1 ,057,264 
203,564 
115,158 
4.925,538 

4,346 

2,811 

2,811 

14,718 

158,959 
1 .060,075 
206,375 
129,876 
4 ,925,538 

Shut-In 

Shut-In 

Producing 

Gas Storage 4 Producing 

Producing 

Producing 

Oriskany Gas Storage 
(1 Shut-In Medina Well) 
Shut-In 

4,103.720 
595,462 
421 .217 
174,245 
3.897,065 
42,992,019 
21 .186,920 
21,777,949 

93,803 
15,103 
7,925 
7.178 
631 .768 
261 .954 
115,442 
146,512 

4,197,523 
610,565 
429,142 
181 .423 
4,528,833 
43,253,973 
21 ,302,362 
21 .924,461 

Producing 

Shut-In 

Shut-In 

Shut-In 

Producing 

Producing & 

Producing 

Producing 

Abandoned 

2,856,697 

50,889 

2,907,586 

Producing 


28.700.054 

13.412,031 

754,000 

265,782 
140.772 
1 ,014,000 

28,965,836 
13.552,803 
1 .768,000 

Producing 

Producing 

Producing 


46,002,000 

718,000 

46,720,000 

Producing 


45,074 

291 .526 

336,600 

Producing 

Shut-In 

Shut-In 


186,617 

14,675 

205,024** 

Production 

Producing 

not available 

3,886,832 

84,662 

3,971 .494 

Producing 


11,260,600 

10,302,606 

957.994 

258,394 

236.356 

22.038 

11 ,518,994 
10.538.962 
980.032 

Producing 

Producing 

Producing 

Shut-In 


54,086 

20,152 

74,238 

Producing 


12,000 
61 .570 

14,925 

44,564 

26,925 

106,134 

Producing 

Producing 





Shut-In 

Shut-In 


109,039 

6,11.0 

115,149 

Producing 


9,499,989 
5,285,295 
1 .677,664 
6,290,608 

300,470 
91 .908 
116,127 
68,727 

9,800.459 
5,377,203 
1 ,793,791 
6,359,335 

Producing 
Producing 
Producing 
Producing & 

Abandoned 

5,551 .180 
611 ,200 
482,273 

68,727 

39,151 

39,151 

5,619,907 
650,351 
521 .424 

Producing 
Producing 4 
Producing 

i Abandoned 

26,298,004 

844,170 

27,142,174 

Producing & 

i Abandoned 

9.335.857 

409.150 

9.745,007 

Producing 4 

Abandoned 

16,962,147 
7,261 ,275 

435,020 

125,214 

17.397.167 

7,386,489 

Producing 
Producing 4 

i Abandoned 

5,934,531 

97,988 

6,032,519 

Producing 


614.321 

27.226 

641 .547 

Producing 



'"Shallow" Gas Production of Field Not Shown 
'Correction 


WEST VIRGINIA 


20 



AlderjRun Field 

Whites Run Field 
i / NEW YORK 


Shallow Sand 
(_y Oil Field 


| Vernon°Field 

; 3 ;: 

L MERCER, 

f 0 Y 







: 

I LAWRENCE^ 


Pool' 




ELK p \ s 

i““ ER |? 4 ., 


iaureb Run Pool 
\ O 




? n.& 

/*$ 7 

c - . 




A 



tCgg r?§ 
68^ESf MORELANf 

'acbeth JPool — _ai' 


,T(c ^ Andersoybreek ] J ool 
5^ j 52 Plattsvifle Field 

47> b rTa/B L A 1 r ' 

Jj 1 h^- 54 ^~y- IQ3 \_ humingdi 


> 56 i 


57 4 



//>' SOMERSET, 
72 ^ETTE^A , 0 > ** I 


-tE^Eff 


BEDFORD \ 


/\ 


b 72 FAYETT E T/o° JOB 
Tine, ^ 


^ FULT(j>N V| 


W. VA. 


C -<6-79 i 

x^ 77 Woodside^Pool ( Shallolw ) 

80 ° ‘ 


\ I M 27 ' 

Shankjsville Pool ~§~7 


/ 


7 


- 


25 


Figure 4. Oil and gas map of Pennsylvoc 


21 


illow Sand 
as Field 


Deep Sand 
Gas Field 


77° 


NEW YORK 




^v 7l0GA 


BRADFORD 


) 

1 

i 

1 



/ \ 

LYC 

OMING \ 


\ 


\ 


\ 



V, 


\ 


V ._ 

1 \ \ 

' o, 

J U 

V ION 

^ 7 

JD 

_ " " /' 

' L . — ' C 

/ 

V 


SUSQUEHANNA 


YOM I NG 


SULLIVAN / 


I--— 


LliZERNE 


\ 

COLUMBIAN 


T 



LACKAWANNA 


SNYDER 


' ) 


I FLIN 


1 


JUNIATA 


PERRY 


. 

„ ‘ r * x N 

/ DAUPHIN 

\ 




(SCHUYLKILlL 




) 


LEBANON 


'7 


CUMBERLAND 


YORK 


/ 


ADAMb , 

|\ 


LANCASTER 


- 40° — 

\ ; 

\ / 

\ ^ L •> > 

76 


\ ^ 


OIL AND GAS MAP 

PENNSYLVANIA 

SHOWING EXPLORATORY WELLS 
REPORTED DURING 

1975 

O OIL WELL 
^ GAS WELL 
-<{>- DRY HOLE 

N os. 8_i - 1 1 2 Deep wells 


75 


lOO miles 


o ng exploratory wells reported in 1975. 


22 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 



I860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 I960 1970 1980 

Figure 5. Annual production of crude oil in Pennsylvania. 


Land Sales 

At the end of 1975 the Pennsylvania Game Commission had 44 active 
leases totaling 33,880 acres, and 43 wells producing on 12 of these leases. 
Production from the 43 wells amounted to 391,559 Mcf during the year. 

In 1975, three tracts of State Forest or Park lands were leased for the 
exploration and development of oil and gas. From the leasing of these 
lands, which are located in Cameron and Potter Counties and total 5,925 
acres, the Department received a first year's rental bonus of $29,810.70. 
The average bonus per acre received from the competitively bid tracts 
was $5.03. 

Also during the year, two tracts were obtained by the acquisition of 
lands for State Forest use which already had oil and gas leases issued upon 
them. The lands containing the oil and gas leases totaled 803 acres and 
all carried the standard rental of $1.00 per acre per year. These lands are 
located in Lycoming County. 


23 



Figure 6. Crude oil prices, production and completions, Bradford District. 


1,700 


24 



i33d oiano 30 SNomie 


Figure 7. Production, consumption and reserves of natural gas in Pennsylvanii 


INDUSTRY ACTIVITY 


25 


Table 12. Crude Oil Prices per Barrel, Pennsylvania, 1975 



Pennsylvania Grade Crude 



Old Oil 

Xew 

or Stripper 

Oil 

1 

/I / 75 to 12/31 / 75 

1/1/75 

5/1 / 75 

11/1/75 

Bradford District 

... §6.83 

§11.85 

§12.37 

§13.07 

Middle District 

6.55 

1 1.48 

12.00 

12.70 

Southwest District 

6.12 

11.33 

1 1.85 

12.55 


Corning Grade 

Crude 



Old Oil 

New 

or Stripper Oil 


1/1/75 to 12/31 / 75 

1/1/75 4/1/75 

6/1/75 

7/1/75 

11/1/75 

Crawford & Erie Cos. §5.17 

§10.00 §11.20 

§11.72 

$1 2.22 

§12.92 

Rental and royalty payments 

received during 

1975, w 

hich were 

related 


to the oil and gas development and storage programs, resulted in a total 
income of $516,715.39. Of this total, royalty payment for the year 
amounted to $76,247.71 for 968,332 Mcf. Rentals for new wildcat acreage 
and past leasing programs totaled $151,362.78 while storage rentals were 
$275,772.65. Other income for pipelines, compressor stations rentals and 
seismic survey totaled $13,332.25. 

At the end of the year, 261,049 acres of State Forest and Park lands 
were under lease for oil and gas exploration and development. This figure 
includes 98,611 acres in gas storage. 

Geophysical Activity 

The Department issued two seismic permits to industry to conduct 
subsurface studies to evaluate the lands for possible oil and gas explora- 
tion. These permits are located in Cameron and Fulton Counties. 

Seismic activity was down from 123 crew-weeks in 1974 to 50 crew-weeks 
in 1975 with most of the activity being Vibroseis. The total cost of the 
seismic work was about $1,000,000. The seismic surveys were made in 
Blair, Butler, Cameron, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Crawford, Franklin, 
Fulton, Greene, Huntingdon, Lawrence, McKean, Mercer, Pike, Potter, 
Tioga, and Venango Counties. 18 of the 67 counties in the commonwealth. 

1975 Highlights 

Discoveries were up to 16 which is one more than in 1974. Of the 16 
discoveries, 15 were gas and 1 oil. What could be a most significant dis- 
covery w'as the #1 Metropolitan Industries (Figure 8, Well B) shale gas 
well drilled by Quaker State Oil Refining Corporation in Beaver County, 
discovering the Darlington field. The well was completed in 1975 but the 


26 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


record was not received until 1976, therefore the record will be published 
in next year's report. The well was drilled to the Queenston (Upper 
Ordovician) and was plugged back and fractured in Upper Devonian 
shale from just above the Onondaga limestone to above the Tully lime- 
stone. The initial production from the shale was 150 Mcfgpd at a 48 hr. 
rock pressure of 1150 psi. Other than early shale gas wells drilled in a 
6 mile wide belt, which was discovered in 1860 (Figure 8, Area C-l) along 
Lake Erie, it is only the third shale gas discovery in the commonwealth. 
The second discovery was in Washington County in 1961, the #1 Cooper 
(Figure 8, Well D) which discovered gas in shale correlative with the 
Bradford Third sandstone. In 1975 a well drilled by Basin Petroleum 
(Figure 8, Well E) to the southwest of the #1 Cooper also found gas in 
the same interval. Northeast of the Darlington discovery, the #1 Edwin 
H. Tobias in Beaver County (Figure 8, Well A and Table 13) found gas 
in the shale just above the Tully. In addition to the above wells, Figure 
8 shows the deep wells that had gas shows in Upper Devonian shales in the 
1000 foot interval above the Onondaga limestone. 

In McKean County, the #2 Minard Run Tract (Figure 4, Table 13) 
found gas in the Little Falls dolomite (Upper Cambrian) , discovering 
the Minard Run pool. The estimated initial production was 500 Mcfgpd 
at a 48 hr. rock pressure of 3000 psi. Work is continuing on this well. In 
Somerset County, the #1 R. f. Lambert found gas in the Oriskany sand- 
stone discovering the Shanksville field (Figure 4, Table 13). The #1 
Thomas Benson was completed 9 months later as a confirmation well. 

The Vernon oil field was discovered by the #1-A Dwight L. Moody in 
Crawford County. Initial production of the well was 184 bopd from the 
Venango Third sandstone. Production is from a small lens of sandstone 
probably with small reserves. 

A seismic reef prospect, #1 Arthur F. Reeves, was drilled in Keating 
Township, McKean County, but no reef development was found. The #1 
Blair Gap Water Supply Co. well in Antis Township, Blair County, was 
completed as a dry hole to the McKenzie (Middle Silurian) at a total 
depth of 11,355 feet. The deepest well in the Appalachian Basin, #1 
Leonard Svetz (Figure 4, Table 13) by Amoco Production Company was 
completed as a dry hole in the Elbrook (Upper Cambrian) at a total 
depth of 21,460 feet. 

The major deep activity has been in northwestern Pennsylvania in the 
Medina play while the Indiana County area has been the most active in 
shallow drilling. Activity will continue in these two areas in 1976. 


Wells with shows of gas in lOOOfoot 
interval above Onondago limestone 



C Gas production from shales in Conadaway Formation 
Figure 8. Shale gas in Pennsylvania. 


28 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


INDUSTRY RELATED ACTIVITIES 

Subsurface Base Maps 

Twenty-three base maps (Figure 9) showing locations of oil and gas 
wells and the outlines of the oil and gas fields are now available. Each 
base map encompasses four 15-minute topographic quadrangles and is at 
the same scale (1 inch equals 1 mile) . A five-minute grid, quadrangle 
names, county boundaries, and major rivers and towns make up the 
background of the base map. All deep wells known and all shallow wells 
on record with the Pennsylvania Geological Survey are located, and the 
status (dry, oil producing, gas producing, etc.) is shown by symbol. Deep 
wells (Tully Formation or deeper) are differentiated and elevation and 
total depth are shown. Symbols indicate the availability of geophysical 
log and sample data on open hie in the Survey’s Oil and Gas Geology 
Division office in Pittsburgh. An index map with the legend shows the 


outlines of oil and gas fields within the mapped area, thus indicating 



OIL AND GAS STUDIES 


29 


areas of extensive pre-1956 drilling. A listing of the field names is also 
included. 

Paper prints of the base maps can be obtained by writing to the State 
Book Store, P. O. Box 1365, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17125. The cost of 
each base map is $0.50, plus a 6 percent sales tax to Pennsylvania residents. 
A check for the appropriate total amount made out to the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania must accompany the order. When ordering please specify 
the map number. 

A cross index of state permit numbers with quadrangle map numbers 
used on the base maps is available from the Pittsburgh Branch of the 
Pennsylvania Geological Survey, 1201 Kossman Building, Stanwix Street, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222. This index is arranged by quadrangles. 
Please specify the quadrangle when requesting this literature. Base maps 
are updated every year. Maps now available were updated as of June 1, 
1976. A list of the Survey’s publications and open file reports can be 
obtained by sending a request to either the Pittsburgh or Harrisburg office. 

PART III. OIL AND GAS GEOLOGY DIVISION STUDIES 

ONONDAGA "REEFS"-McKEAN COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 
by Robert G. Piotrowski 

In 1967, a subsurface Onondaga “reef” was discovered in Jasper Town- 
ship, Steuben County, New York. Subsequent exploration efforts have 
resulted in other “reef” discoveries in the central area of western New 
York (Mesolella, 1975) . “Reef” development apparently occurs where the 
Onondaga Formation is regionally less than 50 feet thick. The “reefs” are 
believed to develop on a more stable or slightly uplifted platform lying 
between subsiding areas. The area of Onondaga thinning was observed to 
extend into north central Pennsylvania, and “reefs” were predicted to be 
present along this trend (Wagner in Kelley, et al., 1970) . 

The first Onondaga “reef” discovery in Pennsylvania was in an area of 
regionally thin (50 feet) Onondaga as predicted when Amoco Production 
Company completed the #1 Amoco-Witco well in McKean County (Fig- 
ure 10) . This Middle Devonian “reef” discovery lies at a depth of 5,172 
feet below the surface. The “reef” is 181 feet thick and has a total gas 
column of 106 feet. The initial production from the well was 200,000 
cubic feet of gas per day. An 86 foot interval from 5,184 feet to 5,270 feet 
was treated with a total of 13,000 gallons of 28% HCL and 10,000 gallons 
of 15% HCL resulting in an initial production after acid treatment of 
3,000,000 cubic feet of gas per day (Figure 11) . 

The Onondaga Formation has been subdivided into four members 
(Oliver, 1954; Peterson, 1974) . These are the Edgecliff member, the 


BO 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 
McKEAN CO. 



>. Dry Hole -Onondaga Onondaga Formation 

60Thickness 0 5 [0 Contour Interval = 10 feet 


T Onondaga Formation MILES McKean Co. , Pa . 

o Drilling Location 

Figure 10. Isopach map of the Onondaga Formation showing the location of 
the Reef Discovery Well at Cyclone Pool, McKean County, 
Pennsylvania. 

Nedrow or Clarence member, the Moorehouse member, and the Seneca 
member (Figure 12) . The Onondaga is deposited over two different units 
in McKean County. In the southeast portion of the county, the Bois Blanc 
Formation, which is here a thin siltstone or shale, underlies the Onondaga. 
In the northwest portion of the county, a sandstone unit underlies the 
Onondaga (Figure 13) . Both of these units lie unconformably on the 
rocks below. The sandstone in the northwest portion of the county has 
been called Oriskany, but the correlation of this sandstone to true 
Oriskany is not certain. It has been suggested that this could possibly be 
a sandy facies of the Bois Blanc Formation (Heyman, personal communi- 
cation) . Just southeast of McKean County, Oriskany sandstone is known 
to exist. Thus, the southeast portion of McKean County is a broad area 
of non-sand deposition which is flanked on the northwest and southeast 
by sandstones. This may define a paleo-high which received no sand 
deposition or from which the sandstones were eroded. 

The lowest member of the Onondaga Formation is the Edgecliff 
member. The Edgecliff is defined on a gamma-ray log by a very low 


OIL AND GAS STUDIES 


31 


AMOCO # I WITCO 
BRADFORD I-IO 



onondaga"reef"discovery 


IPF 200 MCFD at 60PSI NATURAL 
I PF 3,000 MCFD AFTER TREATMENT 

INTERVAL 5184'- 5270'' 

TREATED WITH 3,000 GAL 28%HCL, 
4 5 BPM 4/4/74 

RETREATED WITH IO.OOOGAL 28% 
HCL,a 10,000 GALI5%HCL, 8 . OBPM, 
4/22/74 


DISCOVERY WELL-CYCLONE POOL 
COMPLETED 2/18/74 TD 7,015 


Figure 11. Gamma-ray, neutron, density log of the Discovery Well at Cyclone 
Pool indicating the stratigraphy, pay section, initial production, 
and treatment. 


32 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 



Figure 12. Generalized stratigraphic section showing the members of the 
Onondaga Formation in McKean County, Pennsylvania. 


Modified from Crowley & 
Poore, 1974 


OIL AND GAS STUDIES 


33 


reading. In well cuttings, it is generally a gray to light gray, clean, 
crystalline, cherty, grainstone. Bioherms or “reefs” develop in the Edge- 
cliff member (Lindholm, 1967) . Figure 13 illustrates the thickness of the 
Edgecliff member in McKean County. Note that bioherm or “reef" 
development occurs on a broad area of Edgecliff which is less than ten 
feet thick. This may define a platform area from which the Edgecliff is 
seen to thicken in both directions. This platform area corresponds to the 
northwest edge of the no sand area. This supports the idea of a paleo-high 
which received no sand deposition and very thin Edgecliff deposition. 
This area would be a high energy location and would be ideal for bioherm 
or “reef” development. 

The Nedrow member of the Onondaga Formation is defined by a rela- 
tively high gamma-ray response. The overlying Moorehouse member has 
a lower gamma-ray response similar to the Edgecliff. The Seneca member 
is defined only where a Tioga bentonite bench is present within the 
Moorehouse. The Seneca and Moorehouse members have a similar log 


McKEAN CO. 



Gos Producer -Edgecliff 
-<J>- Dry Hole - Edgecliff 
o Drilling Location 
_a[P Thickness Edgecliff Membe 
Onondaga Formation 


S.S - Sandstone Subcrop 
B.B- Bois Blonc Subcrop 
N D- No Data 


MILES 


20 — Isopoch 

Edgecliff Member 
Onondoqa Formation 

10 

Contour I nterval = I Ofeet 
Me Kean Co., Pa. 


Figure 13. Isopach map of the Edgecliff member of the Onondaga Formation 
with the lithology of the underlying unit indicated, McKean County, 
Pennsylvania. 


34 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


response. The Seneca, Moorehouse, and Nedrow members could not be 
differentiated from each other in well cuttings. This portion of the 
Onondaga is a dark gray, crystalline, argillaceous, fossiliferous, detrital 
micritic limestone interbedded with a light gray, crystalline, micro-grained 
detrital limestone. The thickness of the Seneca, Moorehouse, and Nedrow 
members is shown in Figure 14. Note that no Seneca-Moorehouse-Nedrow 
facies is present over the “reef” and that the facies thins from the north- 
west (platform) to the southeast (basin) . These units seem to define a 
more restricted environment behind the shelf edge “reef” trend. Note 
that the apparent “reef” trend is sinuous and extends approximately 
northeast-southwest through McKean County (Figure 13, 14). 

Fairman Drilling Company is currently drilling an Onondaga reef test 
located approximately 3.1 miles southwest of the Amoco-Witco discovery 
(Figures 10, 13, 14) . Potential for additional Onondaga “reef” discoveries 
in McKean County is excellent. A possible trend is defined by a thin 
Edgecliff facies, which may define a platform, and the outer edge of the 
thick Seneca-Moorehouse-Nedrow facies which appears to define a more 


McKEAN CO. 



NO NoDolo MILES Me Kean Co.. Po . 

Figure 14. Isopach map of the Seneca, Moorehouse, Nedrow members of the 
Onondaga Formation, McKean County, Pennsylvania. 


SUMMARIZED RECORDS 


35 


restricted, possibly lagoonal, environment. Future discoveries in McKean 
County and elsewhere along this trend are anticipated. 

REFERENCES 

Crowley, D. J. and Poore, R. Z., 1974, Lockport middle Silurian and Onondaga middle 
Devonian patch reefs in western New York, in Peterson, D. N., ed., 46th Ann. Mtg. 
Guidebook, New York State Geol. Assoc., State Univ. Fredonia, New York, p. A18-A39. 
Kelley, D. R. and others, 1970, The petroleum industry and future petroleum provinces 
in Pennsylvania in 1970, Pa. Geol. Survey, 4th ser., Min. Resource Rept. 65, 39 p. 
l.indholm, R. C., 1967, Petrology of the Onondaga limestone (middle Devonian), New 
York , unpub. Ph.D. thesis, Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins University. 
Mesolella, K. J. and Weaver, O. D., 1975, What is the overall significance of Appalachia’s 
Devonian pinnacle reefs?, Oil and Gas Journal, v. 73, no. 8, p. 98-103. 

Oliver, W. A., 1954, Stratigraphy of the Onondaga limestone (Devonian) in Central 
New York, Geol. Soc. America Bull , v. 65, p. 621-652. 

Poore, R. Z., 1969, The Leroy bioherrn: Onondaga limestone (middle Devonian) western 
New York, unpub. MS. thesis. Providence, R. I., Brown University, 69 p. 

PART IV. SUMMARIZED RECORDS OF DEEP WELLS 

REPORTED IN 1975 

The information in the following tables has been compiled mainly from 
driller’s logs and location plats received from the Oil and Gas Division of 
the Bureau of Land Protection and Reclamation. Other sources are 
Petroleum Information Corporation (PI) , geophysical logs received by 
the Pennsylvania Geological Survey, and personal communications with 
oil and gas operators. The identification numbers in Table 13 refer only 
to well location numbers on Figure 4 of this report. The more significant 
numbers are the permit numbers by which the wells are hied with the 
Bureau of Land Protection and Reclamation and the unique quadrangle 
numbers by which the Survey hies the wells and locates them on 15- 
minute quadrangle maps. 

A single asterisk appearing on a log indicates that all formation tops 
and total depths were picked from a geophysical log. A log without an 
asterisk means that the formation tops and total depths are from the 
drillers’ log or PI. Where a double asterisk appears, the 7i/2-minute 
quadrangle name and location are given. A plus sign appearing on a log 
indicates that all formation tops and total depths were picked from 
sample descriptions. These tables are listed alphabetically by county and 
by name of well. The elevations are ground (GR) . 

The producing depth record still stands at 11,458 feet in the Tuscarora 
(Lower Silurian) Sandstone, while the drilling depth record was estab- 
lished by the No. 1 Leonard Svetz by Amoco Production Company in 
Somerset County early in 1975 when the well was completed at a total 
depth of 21,460 feet in the LJpper Cambrian. 


Table 13. Summarized Record of Deep Wells Reported in 1975 


36 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 


1 96 1 

Cameron 

20060 

PA Department 
Environmental Res 
WN-1383 

Consol. Gas 
Supply Corp. 

Grove 

Drl f twood 
B 123 

<S) 

•+- o 

IT) O 

3 

«4- m 

o 
O o 
O 00 
On r'' 

CM 

7-16-75 

2184 GR 

*6094-61 78 

*6765-6776 

*6776-6851 

*6851- 






6925 

Helderberg 

NS0G 

Abandoned 
New Pool 
Wildcat 

103 

Blair 

20008 

Blair Gap Water 
Supply Co. #1 

Amoco Production 
Co. 

Antis 

Altoona 
E 2 

IS) 

*4— O 

O O 
o o 
o 

IS) 

3 

<4- O 
CM 

O O 

O CO 
cm 

ON 

9-24-74 

2360 GR 

6766-6800 

Marcel lus and 
Needmore: 
7130-7770 

7770-7824 

7824-8100 

Tonoloway-8100 
Wills Creek-9100 

Bloomsburg- 
W11 llamsport: 
10,004-10,100 

McKenz'le: 

10,100- 



11,355 

McKenzie 

NS0G 

Abandoned 
New Field 
Wildcat 

CM 

Bedford 

20054 

D. W. & Annie 
Clark #1 

Columbia Gas 
Transmission Corp 

W. Providence 

Clearvil le 
C 42 

IS) 

•*- o 
o 
O o 
in o 

CM 

21,050 ft. W 
78°1 5' 

in 

o 

00 

1353 GR 

Purcell: 7020 
Marcell us: 7100 









7203 

Marcel lus 

NS0G 

Abandoned 
New Field 
Wildcat 

o 

Beaver 

20057 

Edwin H. Tobias 
#1 

Thomas F. 
Jennings 

Darlington 

New Castle 
G 12 

St 

•*- o 
in 
o O 
o o 
00 
co 

3 

<4- in 
CM 
o o 
o o 
ON 00 

CM 

6-1-75 

1225 GR 


4524-4721 

4721-4760 

4760 






4930 

Helderberg 

237 Mcf Nat. 
650 psl/12 days 
Darlington Field 
SP Discovery 
Coalbank Run 

Dnnl 


Armstrong 

21719 

Norman R. Martin 
#1 Unit-9 

J & J 

Enterprises 

<S 

a> 

c 

1 

Elders Ridge 
G 52 

2,600 ft. S 
40°35 1 

19,450 ft. W 
79°25' 

4-10-75 

1335 KB 

*6635-6764 

*7170-7214 
Gas 7267-7316 
*7214-7339 

*7339-7361 
Gas 07345-46 

*7361- 






7439 

Helderberg 

1 ,200 Mcf AF 
2,700 ps 1/48 hrs. 
Roaring Run 
Field 


Armstrong 

21710 

Raymond Lorant 
#1 

J & J 

Enterprises 

a» 

c 

E 

sz 

Elders Ridge 
D 51 

■M - 
■4- O 
O O 
O O 
in 

ON 

CM 

3 

CM 
O O 
O ON 

cm r~~ 

3-27-75 

1186 KB 

*6434-6563 

*6970-7002 
Gas 07068 
*7002-7140 

CO ON 
lO 3- 

r-~ r-» 
l <Sj 
o 

to 

r-~ ca 

« 

*7163- 






7255 

Helderberg 

1 ,300 Mcf AF 
2,750 psl/48 hrs. 
Roaring Run 
Field 


Armstrong 

21683 

Joseph H. Heilman 
#1 

J & J 

Enterprises 

at 

c 

1 

-A* 

2 

Elders Ridge 
D 49 

4-> - 

>4— O 
«S- 
O O 
O O 

CO 

3 

>4- in 
CM 
O o 
in on 

CO 

1-20-75 

CO 

CM 

*6580-6718 

*7110-7149 

*7149-7268 

*7268-7292 

*7292- 






7380 

Helderberg 

1 ,100 Mcf AF 
2,750 psl/48 hrs. 
Roaring Run 
Field 


Armstrong 

21684 

William E. Geiger 
#1-14 

J S J 

Enterprises 

Kiskiminetas 

Elders Ridge 
D 50 

<4- O 
O o 
o o 

CO *j- 

3 

* 4 - in 
CM 
o o 
O ON 

cm 

ON 

2-1-75 

1401 KB 

*6666-6797 

*7198-7217 
Gas 07246 
*7217-7347 

ON CM 
lO lO 
CO CO 

i e. 

l/l 

co «3 

*7369- 






7469 

Helderberg 

1 ,100 Mcf AF 
2,875 psi/72 hrs. 
Roaring Run 
Field 


Armstrong 

21675 

Harry L. Dando 
#1 

J & J 

Enterprises 

Kiskiminetas 

Elders Ridge 
D 48 

IS) 

4-* - 
*4- O 

O o 
O O 

CM 

3 

4-* - 
<4- in 
CM 
O o 
in on 
co r-~ 

1-3-75 

1538 KB 

*6770-6900 

*7318-7340 
Gas 07408 
*7340-7473 

*7473-7496 
Gas 07485 

*7496- 






7612 

Helderberg 

1 ,000 Mcf AF 
2,750 psl/48 hrs. 
Roaring Run 
Field 


Armstrong 

21672 

Veryl M. Clark 
#2 

3 eoples Natural 
Gas #4938 

Parks 

Freeport 
C 2 

O o 
o o 

ON 

CM 

3 

•4- O 

O 0 
in on 
O 

ID 

12-14-74 

1192 GR 

6565-6700 

7051-7064 

7064-7197 

7197-7209 
>G & SW In Cht-Or. 

7209- 






7331 

1 

| Helderberg 

Deeper Pool Test; 
Shallow Gas Prod. 
102 Mcf AF 
650 psi/4 days 
Vandergrift Field 

I MAP NUMBER 

COUNTY 

Permit Number 

NAME OF WELL 

OPERATOR 

TOWNSHIP 

QUADRANGLE 

LATITUDE 

I LONGITUDE 

DATE COMPLETED 

ELEVATION 

TULLY 

LIMESTONE I 

CHERT 

OR ISKANY 



HELDER 8ERG 

KEYSER-BASS ISLAND 
SALINA 

GUELPH-LOCKPORT 

BLACK WATER 

CLINTON 

IRONDEQUOIT 

MEDINA 

WHIRLPOOL 

OUEENSTON 

TOTAL DEPTH 

DEEPEST FORMATION REACHED 

RESULT 

ONONDAGA 


SUMMARIZED RECORDS 



Table 13. ( Continued ) 


38 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 



SUMMARIZED RECORDS 


39 



Table 13. (Continued) 


40 


OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN 1975 



Venango 

23657 

F. E. Smith. 
#1 

Peoples Natural 
Gas Co. 

c 

1 

Hi 1 1 iards 
A-7 

m 

<4- m 

o o 
o «— 

*3 *3 

3 

<*- in 
in 
o o 
vo <n 
00 r- 

CM 

6-24-75 

CO 

VO 

*4408-4470 

*4632-4657 

*4657-4703 

Bois Blanc 
*4703-4753 
♦absent 

*4753-4803 

*4803-4938 

*4938-5780 

*5780-6062 

*5933- 

*6062-6378 
Rose Hill 
*6175-6378 , 

*6378-6608 
Gas 06550 
*6598-6608 

*6608- 

6730 

Queenston 

13 Mcf Nat. 
350 Mcf AF 
1600 psi/4 days 
Irwin Pool 

CO 

o 

Somerset 

20042-R-P 

Earl H. Weimer 
#1 

Amoco Production 
Co. 

Mi 1 ford 

Meyersdale 

B -6 

■4- O 

o 
O c 
<£> ° 
CO 

22,450 ft. W 
79°05* 

3-25-74 

2075 GR 


9134- 

-9358 

9358-9800 

9800- 






o 

o 

O CM 
O CTl 
CO 
CTl 

O t- 

t— f- 
O TJ 
0 ) 
cc 

Helderberg? 

NS0G 

Abandoned 
New Field 
Wildcat 

CTv 

O 

Somerset 

20045 

Leonard Svetz 
#1 

Amoco Production 
Co. 

Middle Creek 

Confluence 
B-l 3 

8,100 ft. S 
40°00‘ 

3 
- O 

>4- O 
CTi 
O r^ 

43 

CO 

2453 GR 


o 

o 

CO 

o 

o 

CO 

CO 

o 

*3 

in 

00 

o 

O 

CO 

8540-9050 

Tonoloway & 
Wills Creek 
9050-10300 

McKenzie 

10300-10950 

Rochester & 
Rose Hill 
10950-11400 

Tuscarora 

11400-11900 

Juniata-Reedsville 

11900-15860 

21 ,460 

Gatesburg 

Trent: 15860-17000 
M.Ord: 17000-17450 
L.Ord: 17450-20860 
U. Camb: 20860 
NS0G; 0 & A 
Deepest well In 
Appalachian Basin_ 

O 

Somerset 

20043 

R. J. Lambert 
#1 

Amoco Production 
Co. 

Stony Creek 

Windber 

G-4 

*4- LO 

o 
O O 

o o 

43- 43 - 

3 

VO 
O o 
O CO 
cm r--. 

9-22-73 

2381 KB 

s 

43 

*8478-8504 

*8504-8577 

*8577-8620 

♦8620- 

Gas 08636-8670 






8740 

Helderberg 

2,500 Mcf Nat. 

1 ,856 Mcf AF 
2224 psl/48 hrs. 
Discovery 
Shanksville 
Field 

O 

Somerset 

20051 

Pete & Bertha 
Gerula #1 

Amoco Production 
Co. 

Paint 

Windber 

C-5 

9,100 ft. S 
40°1 5 1 

6,500 ft. W 
78°45‘ 

00 

2291 KB 

7730-7810 

*8700-8722 

*8722-8775 

*8775-8827 

*8827-9095 

in 

CTl 

o 

CTl 

* 





9270 

Keyser 

NS0G 

Abandoned 
New Field 
Wildcat 

vD 

o 

Somerset 

20049 

Thomas Benson 
if 1 

Amoco Production 
Co. 

Stony Creek 

s_ 

.a 10 

T3 1 
C CD 

3 

8,900 ft. S 
40°05 1 

3 

O if 

O CO 
CTl 

5-31-74 

2343 GR 

7550-7596 

8522-8654 

8654-8788? 
Gas 08740-8770 

CO 

co 






8840 

Helderberg 

1,300 Mcf Nat. 
3665 psi 
Extension 
Shanksville 
Field 

95 

Potter 

20478 

PA Game Comm. 
#1 L-492S 

Columbia Gas 
Transmission Corp. 

Pleasant 

Coudersport 

E-69 

in 

O O 

m 

CTV 43 

3 

14- VO 

o 

O o 
O CO 
vo 

11-4-74 

2428 GR 

*5048-5090 

*5574-5606 

*5606-5614 

*5614- 






5709 

Helderberg 

30 Mcf Nat. 

30 psi/12 hrs. 
Deeper Pool 
Wildcat. Ended 
Shallow Product. 
Clara Hill 
Field 


Mercer 

20113 

C. S. Osborne 
#5998 

National Fuel 
Gas Supply Corp. 

Worth 

Stoneboro 

1-16 

■4- O 
CM 
O O 

n ■— 

QO 43 
43 

3 

•4- O 
o 
O o 
O O 
r-' CO 

9-5-75 

1439 KB 

*3928-3984 

*4134-4167 

*4167-4264 

absent 

*4264-4305 

vn cm 

CO CO 

O CO 
CO *3 
•cr ^3 
* ■* 

*5132-5380 
Gas 05312, 5328, 
5362 

*5380- 



5443 

Rochester 

353 Mcf Nat. 
990 Mcf AF 
1790 psi/24 hrs. 
Kilgore Pool 

CT. 

McKean 

33110-P 

Arthur F. Reeves 
#1 

Pennzoil Co. 

Keating 

Smethport 

G-5 

14,275 ft. S 
41 °50' 

3 

*-> CM 
V4— 0 

vo 

CM 

11-18-75 

1534 KB 

*4178-4212 

*4694-4728 
Bols Blanc? 
*4728-4730 

absent 

*4730-4795 

*4795-4843 

*4843- 





4897 

Sal ina 

NS0G 

Deeper Pool 
Wildcat 
Smethport 
Field 

CO 

CT> 

McKean 

31744 

Minard Run 
Tract #2 Lot-50 

Minard Run 
Oil Co. 

Lafayette 

Bradford 
E-l 1 

>4- VD 

O O 
O r— 

VO 

3 

>4- VO 
VO o 
I — CO 

CTl 

1-10-75 

2257 KB 

CO 

CTl 

rL 

CM 

*5162-5212 
Bois Blanc 
*5212-5228 

absent 

*5228-5290 

*5290-5338 

*5338-6200 

in 

o 

VO 

o 

o 

CM 

vo 

*6405-6590 

*6515-6520 

*6590-6740 

CM 

ID 

CO 

O 

*3 

VD 

CO 

o 

Cambrian 

Trent: 9120-10,010 
Camb: 10010-10400 
3a s 010,010-10,230 
500 Mcf Nat. 
3000 psi/48 hrs. 
DPT Discovery 
Minard Run Pool 

<r 

UJ 

CD 

2 

15 

Z 

Q. 

< 

5 

COUNTY 

Permit Number 

NAME OF WELL 

OPERATOR 

TOWNSHIP 

QUADRANGLE 

LATITUDE 

LONGITUDE 

DATE COMPLETED 

ELEVATION 

TULLY 

LIMESTONE | 

CHERT 

OR ISKANY 

HELDERBERG 

KEYSER-BASS ISLAND 
SALINA 

GUELPH-LOCKPORT 

BLACK WATER 

CLINTON 

IRONDEQUOIT 

MEDINA 

WHIRLPOOL 

QUEENSTON 

TOTAL DEPTH 

DEEPEST FORMATION REACHED 

RESULT 

ONONDAGA 


SUMMARIZED RECORDS 


41